Microsoft Bob

Just a short, simple blog for Bob to share some tips and tricks.

Be sure to check out my non-technical blog at www.geekybob.com.

Month List

Recovering a Mirror Set on Windows 10

I run a mirror on the C drive for one of my Windows 10 systems, and a few nights ago that system wouldn't boot; I kept getting errors like "VOLMGRX internal error" and "A recently serviced boot binary is corrupt". I tried a few of the automatic Windows 10 recovery options while my system was rebooting, but nothing seemed to work. Skipping past the steps it took to get there, I also tried using the "bootrec /fixmbr" and "bootrec /fixboot" commands, with no luck, either.

However, since I was using a mirror set for the primary drive, I was able to do the following:

When I rebooted my system, I chose Troubleshoot for my startup option.

windows_10_recover_mirror_set_1

Step 2 - On the Troubleshoot screen, I chose Advanced options.

windows_10_recover_mirror_set_2

On the Advanced options screen, I chose Command prompt.

windows_10_recover_mirror_set_3

When the Command prompt opened, I typed the following commands:

diskpart
list volume

This returned a table like the following illustration, and I looked for the volume which showed status as "Failed Rd":

Volume ### Ltr Label Fs Type Size Status Info
---------- --- ----------- ----- ---------- ------- --------- --------
Volume 0 C C-DRIVE NTFS Partition 1848 GB Failed Rd Boot
Volume 1 ESP FAT32 Partition 500 MB Healthy System  
Volume 2 WINRETOOLS NTFS Partition 454 MB Healthy Hidden  
Volume 3 Image NTFS Partition 12 GB Healthy Hidden  
Volume 4 DELLSUPPORT NTFS Partition 1087 MB Healthy Hidden  

Once I knew the volume that was having the issue, I was able to run the following commands to recover the mirror set:

select volume 0
recover

I knew that the recovery was going to take a long to complete, and I could have used "detail volume" command every few minutes to check the status, (which will show "Rebuild" in the status column). But the truth is - it was already way past midnight, so I simply went to sleep for the night. When I got up the following morning, everything was fine and I was able to reboot successfully.


FYI - The following article has all the information you need about using the Windows DiskPart command, although be forewarned - you can really screw up your system if you do something wrong.

DiskPart Command-Line Options

Posted: Mar 23 2018, 11:26 by Bob | Comments (0)
  • Currently 0/5 Stars.
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Filed under: Windows | Troubleshooting
Social Bookmarks: E-mail | Kick it! | DZone it! | del.icio.us
Comments are closed